Penny Pincher's ICD-10 Prep Plan

With only about two months to go until the mandatory switch to ICD-10, your clinic should be fully entrenched in its preparations. If you started early, you’re probably feeling pretty good about where you’re at. Maybe you even feel totally ready to tackle the change. But if you didn’t start early—or if you haven’t started at all—you’re likely feeling the pressure on your practice and your bottom line. If your clinic’s staff doesn’t understand how to correctly code using ICD-10, you’ll suffer the financial consequences. Luckily, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have granted providers with a one-year grace period—which could save you some delayed payments and claim denials due to ICD-10 coding errors. But the cost of transitioning to ICD-10 begins well before we actually switch code sets.

To help cover the cost of preparation, you could consider securing a line of credit with your bank or having three to six-months’ worth of cash on hand to keep your clinic afloat. But if those options aren’t available to you—or if you’d rather keep your purse strings tied up—you’ll need a penny-pinching preparation plan. Here are seven tips to help you prepare for the switch to ICD-10 without breaking the bank:

  1. Clear out your current reimbursement backlog and collections accounts to beef up your cash reserves.
  2. Take advantage of free educational tools, like ICD-10 for PT and the WebPT Blog, to educate you and your staff. Training is necessary, but it doesn’t have to be expensive.
  3. Determine your practice’s most commonly used diagnosis codes—and their most specific ICD-10 equivalents—to soften the blow to your productivity come October 1.
  4. Test with your payers and vendors. Testing externally is free and verifies that all of your software and outsourced services are ready to receive, process, and remit for ICD-10 codes. If they aren’t ready, you might have to consider working with new vendors. That might not be in your budget, but unprepared vendors will cost you more in the long run.
  5. Asses your current billing workflow. Determine how quickly and cleanly your practice currently processes and receives payment for claims using ICD-9 codes. This will allow you to correct any kinks in your workflow, and you’ll have a much better sense of how ICD-10 affects your cash flow after the transition.
  6. Test internally. Ensuring your team efficiently and appropriately assigns ICD-10 codes doesn’t cost you much more than time right now, and it will save you a lot of money later.
  7. Create a retention plan. If any of your staff are already trained on ICD-10, they’re a valuable commodity. Do what you can to keep these employees—and their knowledge—at your practice.

Ready or not, we’ll have to transition to ICD-10 on October 1 (barring any unlikely Congressional delays). Fortunately, it doesn’t have to cost an arm and a leg to prepare your practice. With these seven tips in mind, you can get your clinic up to speed—and keep your savings intact.